Azahar Coffee Company // Finca La Argelia

Azahar Coffee Company // Finca La Argelia
Finca La Argelia
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Here we are, Dear Readers. We have to come to the end of the line, the bottom of the box—the January MistoBox, that is.

This is the last of the reviews of the four coffees that MistoBox sent me this month. But before I go any further, I’d like to personally thank Samantha and Connor, at MistoBox, for being so generous. This has been a tremendous week so far, at the Table, and you two are to thank for that.

Now, without any further ado…

Welcome to my Table, here in the corner of this cafe. Today we are sipping a cup of Finca La Argelia, from Azahar Coffee Company in Mountain View, California. Feel free to pull up a chair.

Unfortunately, I couldn’t find much information about the farm itself during my research. I did, however, find this video about the farm, that was produced by Azahar Coffee Company:

the basics:

origin: Pijao, Colombia
farm: Finca La Argelia
elevation: 1580-1900 meters above sea level
cultivar: Caturra, Castillo
process: semi-washed, patio dried
certification: standard

the coffee:

Brewing the Finca La Argelia, I am lulled in by a warm and soft, but rich and spicy, aroma with notes of spiced wood, cinnamon, citrus, and lightly floral aromatics.

Spicy cedar greets the palate first, sending tingles up and down my tongue; the first few sips finishing off with a flutter of lilac aromatics. As it cools off a little bit, a soft salted caramel flavor introduces itself, flowing out of the cup lazily. At this point, a few fruity flavors come out, like juicy red apple and strawberry.

Closer to room temperature, caramel becomes the dominant flavor at the front of each sip; the fruits become more fleshed out, more intense, juicier—now I’m picking out notes of apple, plum, green grape, and blood orange. A sharp citrus acidity streams right down the middle of the tongue, before swirling around the palate, revealing cashews in the finish, and leaving behind nothing but a clean, crisp, fresh feeling.

Full body; silky mouthfeel; citrus acidity; clean finish.

the bottom line:

With the Finca La Argelia, from Azahar Coffee Company, you get a really solid, very straightforward cup of coffee that doesn’t really have many frills and thrills, but one that certainly isn’t lacking in flavor. This is a wonderful, tasty Colombian brew that isn’t going to “wow” you with complexity, but isn’t going to disappoint you either.

And, thus, wraps up January MistoBox week. When I did my roundup of coffee subscription services, I highlighted that MistoBox had a great concept and a great service, sending four coffees per month right to your front door for a really low price. Now, I can go a step beyond that and affirm that, not only does MistoBox send four coffees per month right to your front door for a really low price, they send you four quality coffees. And I think that’s saying a lot for a coffee subscription service—any company could send four coffees per month; but to send four quality coffees month after month after month? That’s a feat.

The four coffees I had this week were really, really good—there wasn’t one of them that I wouldn’t recommend to anybody.

Did you like this? Comments, questions, and suggestions are always welcome here at the Table! Pull up a chair and speak your mind by entering a comment below. Also remember to like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter!



  • jbviau

    Thanks for the reviews. Would you care to weigh in on the issue of freshness with respect to the likes of Craft and MistoBox? Despite the typical 8-9 day post-roast delay on the samples, I’ve never felt it was an issue in the cup with either service (yes, I’ve tried both). However, some specialty coffee lovers reflexively balk at this aspect of the sampler subscription experience.

    • I understand completely. Initially, this was my first cause for concern about subscription services. I can’t speak for Craft since I’ve never ordered from them, but I can testify positively on MistoBox’s behalf. The four coffees I received were a six days off roast date, which means I had a solid week to drink the coffees they sent me before even started to go stale. The four sample sizes are just enough to make two cups with a Hario V60, which is about all I need to decide whether a coffee is good or not. Coincidentally, I typically drink two to four cups per day. So the amount that they sent me was actually the perfect amount to last me for the week it took for the coffees to start going stale.

      Remember, a coffee is NOT dead at two weeks post-roast – that’s when it starts going dead. All four still had plenty of life and flavor in them in the two or three days it took me to finish the box off.

      • And, honestly, if it takes you longer than a whole to get through the four samples that Misto sends… You probably don’t care enough about coffee to be worried about how far off the roast the samples are.


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